A closer look at soil acidity – Country News

River plains lead to a project to improve the understanding of acidity and pH structure in local soils as well as management tools available to farmers.

According to Jane McKennes, Riverine Plains Project Officer, acid soils are limited in production and economic returns, especially in sensitive crops.

“While many ceremonies are working to maintain soil pH values ​​above p5 through regular soil testing and targeted lime applications, we are seeing significant acid deposits in the soil between 5 cm and 20 cm,” he said.

“Ground lime moves very slowly on the surface of the soil and this means that lime only works in the local zone, as it does not reach acidic layers on the surface.

As part of the project, Riverine Plains’ lime mix will establish a duplicate experiment on how to improve lime distribution on soil profile and the impact of soil acidity on future crops.

Some of the techniques considered for the hearing include splinting, dislocation, tearing and shaking.

The lime treatment test will be launched in February 2022 and will compare the performance of the next crop on the next treatment.

These results are then used to inform the economic analysis of treatment options, and an in-depth soil sample can also be used to understand the nutritional value, pH, and soil organic carbon differences between treatments.

“The quality of the lime can be very variable, so we will test the quality of the lime and set up a display test at the same site,” he said.

The lineup includes primary sulfur treatment to accelerate acidification and future effects if lime is not used.

The project’s steering committee, Andrew Russell, a southern advocate of the Regzerglen Farmer and the Grain Research and Development Corporation, said that when soil exploration is traditionally put together on the ground and in the ground, many farmers may be unaware that they have acid soil that restricts production.

As part of the project, Riverine Plains’ lime mix will establish a duplicate experiment on how to improve lime distribution on soil profile and the impact of soil acidity on future crops.

Some of the techniques considered for the hearing include splinting, dislocation, tearing and shaking.

The lime treatment test will be launched in February 2022 and will compare the performance of the next crop on the next treatment.

These results are then used to inform the economic analysis of treatment options, and an in-depth soil sample can also be used to understand the nutritional value, pH, and soil organic carbon differences between treatments.

“The quality of the lime can be very variable, so we will test the quality of the lime and set up a display test at the same site,” he said.

The lineup includes primary sulfur treatment to accelerate acidification and future effects if lime is not used.

The project’s steering committee, Andrew Russell, a southern advocate of the Regzerglen Farmer and the Grain Research and Development Corporation, said that when soil exploration is traditionally put together on the ground and in the ground, many farmers may be unaware that they have acid soil that restricts production.

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