Harvest panties will be available in many colors next spring

Now that we can find a broom in the ground, it is time for all the harvest.

Pansies are a great year to plant because the harvest mothers and spring bulbs connect the flower bed. Now is the time to choose your favorite color and plant a few.

Autumn pans have larger, larger flowers than spring pans. One reason is that the pancreas, which grows during the winter, has time to develop a good root system in autumn and early winter.

In early October, generally before the 15th, so root systems are established before winter temperatures cool the plants to the ground.

The University of Kentucky’s various experiments show that pans planted in the fall perform better than those produced in the spring.

Although the pans planted in the fall have some flowers in autumn and winter, it is spring on the real show. Plants grow in many stems and are usually at least twice as large as those planted in the spring. Depending on the weather in late winter, pans planted in the fall will bloom in March or earlier.

It is not uncommon for plants to bloom in 35 to 50 flowers at a time.

Spring pans are better tolerated in the summer than in summer. However, they grow only vigorously for a short period of time and are moderate in size, size and number of flowers compared to fallen pansies.

Another benefit of fall pans is that they give us a lot of color when you plant a colorful floral display in a spring garden.

Early spring flowering is usually limited to flower bulbs, such as tulips, daffodils and crosses. Pancakes were equally impressive, offering colors and combinations that are not found in other spring flowers. Pancakes are well adapted to cool the spring air and remain attractive throughout the spring.

Following these gardening tips will ensure that there will be plenty of colorful punch flowers next spring.

Plant pans in southern exposure or in full sunlight.

Use an organic mattress with wood or bark chips.

When plants begin to sprout in the spring, apply a general purpose, liquid fertilizer.

For old flowers, use a black plastic mix or plant pan on the south wall.

For information, check with Hardin County Cooperative Expansion Service at 270-765-4121 or hardin.ca.uky.edu.

Amy Aldanderfer, Hardin County Extension Agent, is the coordinator for the Fruit and Vegetable Development Program. She can be reached at 270-765-4121 or Amy.Aldenderfer@uky.edu.

Amy Aldanderfer, Hardin County Extension Agent, is the coordinator for the Fruit and Vegetable Development Program. She can be reached at 270-765-4121 or Amy.Aldenderfer@uky.edu.

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