Heat strikes plants; Help with identification; And wooden tours

The reader’s flower quail fights in the heat

Q: Shortly after I cut the cauliflower two months ago, I applied air conditioning and feeding because many old leaves were appearing and falling off. I’m seeing the same thing now. I bought it again to shape the plant a little more, and new leaves still look normal. The strategic product should be applied only once a year. What is this, and do you think I should apply to Bayer again? It worries me.

D. The quail is a tree shrub that begins early in its growth and usually begins early in its growth. At this time I do not spray anything for pests – diseases or insects. Wait until the plant is completely destroyed and in the spring. Flower quince is a strong plant, and I don’t care. We must only feel sorry for these weak plants in this heat and humidity. Water when it dries, but nothing else.

Hardy hibiscus bloom is coming to an end

Q: When the days are getting shorter and you are trying to produce seeds, will the strong hibiscus stop wearing new flowers at the end of the summer? I have read that they are heavy feeders and have fed them, but I think I will have to fertilize again later this time. I kept watering, they are strong and healthy, but short on new flower buds.

A: The annual strong hibiscus, which has a dinner plate size, has a limited flowering period. They usually bloom from late June to August. Some species can grow for a long time, and some, like the Confederate Rose Hibiscus mutabilis, do not begin to germinate until late September or October. Hardy species thrive in adequate moisture and sunlight. Occasionally fertilizer is a bonus. When your flower is finished, I will continue to water it. They can grow from seed, but I am not very patient until they grow up. I sow seeds in the spring or buy new plants to get more.

Passion: The vine blooms, but the fruits bear many seeds

Q: This [reader submitted photo] Can it be identified for me in the yard, on the fence, in the wild and in abundance?

A: These small egg-shaped fruits are derived from the flowers of interest. I think the flowers are amazing, but the fruits are loaded with seeds. Some gardeners find the vine to be invasive.

Tulip poplar is one of the largest native trees in the state

Q – Please tell me the name of this [reader submitted photo]. Thank you.

A: The tree in question is a tulip poplar or a tulip tree. It is one of the largest native trees in our state. His hometown is Crowley’s Ridge in Arkansas. If planted in your yard, stand by at your chosen site and preview. Make sure it does not grow into power lines or is too close to your home.

Safe trees in wooden forest tours

Q: We have these holes in all the pecan trees in my mother-in-law’s yard in Scott. As you can see, they run online. There are rows running up to the branches. Do you have any idea what this might be? Should the trees be treated?

A: Picnics are often visited by tree trunks and sawmills, which line up holes in the trunk. Pictures just like you are very old. There is no reason to do anything on an established tree. Some gardeners try to scare the birds away from the trunks of the young gourds.

Janet Carson, who retired at the University of Arkansas Extension Service 38 years later, is one of Arkansas’s best-known horticulturalists. Her blog is at arkansasonline.com/planitjanet. Write to her at 2221, Little Rock, AR 72203 or email her [email protected]

In this photo, the reader’s red circles highlight the lines in the peck tree; Juices and wood make such holes. (Special for Democrat-Gazette)

Passionvine is a native floating vine with beautiful flowers, but the fatty seeds hold so many seeds that they can easily get out of hand.  (Special for Democrat-Gazette)

Passionvine is a native floating vine with beautiful flowers, but the fatty seeds hold so many seeds that they can easily get out of hand. (Special for Democrat-Gazette)

This sprout grows into one of the largest native trees in the Arkansas, tulip poplar or tulips.  (Special for Democrat-Gazette)

This sprout grows into one of the largest native trees in the Arkansas, tulip poplar or tulips. (Special for Democrat-Gazette)

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