How to make the best use of spring gardening

A guide to harvesting and storing your produce, from plants and onions to fruits and vegetables

If you grow your own fruits and vegetables, you will soon realize that the task of collecting and storing all those sweet, fresh produce is just as challenging as growing it.

For example, how can you better protect those useless apples from rotting? What is the best way to store that wonderful potato harvest? When should you pick those strawberries? What to do with that smorgasbord type of fresh vegetables? Feeling a little confused, anxious and confused? Here are some tips on how to flirt with that sweet home taste and goodness as much as possible in the coming months.

Plants

Photo: iStock

Let’s start this year with flexible bands and plants that can be easily dried in the air this year, with a warm, dry, well-ventilated, light, age-appropriate technique. For many varieties, including mint, sage, bay, rosemary, thyme, oregano and marjoram. Drying plants in this way usually takes 6-8 weeks, so it is a good idea to keep each inverted package in a small paper bag when it dries to protect it from dust and insects.

Also, spread a lot of herbs on shallow trays covered with parchment paper and then place in a preheated oven at 140-160F for 140 minutes, during which time they should feel dry and brittle. To keep their strong taste for as long as possible, store your dried herbs in small airtight containers and store in a cool, dry, dark place.

Fruit

Photo: iStock

Photo: iStock

Many varieties of fruit trees and cane fruits, such as blackberries and berry fruits, are also planted at this time of year. To protect it from starving birds, wasps, and other insects, cover the lower branches with fine vegetable nets during ripening.

Remember that early apple and pear varieties are not suitable for long-term storage, so eat as much as you can, or cook them into a clean dish and refrigerate. But as long as you do not use the flawless fruit that is allowed to ripen properly on the tree, later-mature varieties will store well. Take special care when it comes to wind-blown fruit, as it can be an easy way to rot or even a small wound or skin. In shallow, covered boxes (with a few holes for ventilation) in a cool, dry bowl, store these late-grown apple and pear varieties well for several weeks until you make sure you inspect them weekly and quickly. Remove any rotten marks.

To judge when your home apples and pears are ripe for harvest, gently turn the fruit from the branch. If it is ready, it should come very easily. Pears usually need extra time (1-2 weeks) at room temperature to reach perfect juice. Figs, ripe fruits include dark skin, tenderness and small cracks, and sweet nectar at the base of the fruit. Fresh figs, like most spring berries, cool well.

Photo: iStock

Photo: iStock

Other ways to take full advantage of all that delicious fruit harvest: pick, store, squeeze and boil, make fruit juice, cake or perry or use an electric dryer (see) fruithillfarm.com) Dry into pieces.

Many varieties of vegetables can also be used to make delicious fruit juices by simply placing them in a clean canned vodka, gin, rum, or brandy.

Onion

Photo: iStock

Photo: iStock

Spring onions are another kitchen vegetable that is usually ready to be harvested this year. Signs of ripening include yellow leaves that have begun to fall, during which time the plants should slowly rise (unpaired leaves) and spread out in a warm, dry place such as a bright glass house or sunny balcony.

Once well dried, place them or (this may sound strange but it works beautifully) with an old narrow cut-out cut-out cut-off cut-off cut-off cut-off cut-off cut-off cut-off cut Cut them into pieces and put them in a bowl. They are stored in this way until next spring.

Root vegetables

Photo: iStock

Photo: iStock

Even if your soil is free to flow during the winter, root vegetables such as carrots, celery, Jerusalem artichokes, Swedish herons, and parsnips can be kept in a safe place as long as necessary. However, in gardens and areas exposed to winter humidity and large sesame populations, it is best to remove them from mid-October and store them in sandboxes in a cool, dry bowl. This will keep them fresh and fresh until next spring. Maincrop beetroot should also be harvested in October and can be stored in this way as the main potato.

Pumpkins

Photo: iStock

Photo: iStock

Pumpkins and winter squash are another popular kitchen garden and category crops to be harvested in the coming weeks, but they need some romantic attention to give the best. In order to protect the rotten or rotten, rotten or rotten material on a wet surface, gently place a small piece of wood or old roofing material during ripening, and do not accidentally cut off the damaged stem or handle. Fruit mixed with the rest of the plant.

Ideally, pumpkins and winter pumpkins should be taken when all the leaves die naturally, but in our typical cool, wet Irish summer, spring frosts can hit the plants, making them inedible. In colder climates, protect vulnerable plants from cold temperatures by one layer or two at night to help them heal and harden (avoid this during the day). However, it is still important to collect the fruit before the first deadly frost, keeping the stem or handle attached to the fruit to prevent rot.

If there is severe frost before the outer skin is well cured, place the fruit outside for any bright, hot dry days during the first few weeks after the harvest to complete the process, and make sure you cover the inside at night. Frost is forecast. Pumpkins and winter pumpkins, if properly cured, can be stored in a cool, dry place and stored well until next spring. Roasted, canned, baked in a pot or heart-shaped winter soup, they serve as another sweet, nutritious reminder of a delicious, homemade winter latte.

For more information on creativity, clever ways to keep fruits and vegetables in your kitchen garden or room, check out Darina Allen’s forgotten cooking skills and cooking skills at Sandor Ellix Katz.

Photo: iStock

Photo: iStock

In the garden this week

It is a good time of year to carry out maintenance on lawns and to sow grass when needed. For best results, walk up to a field with a good quality soil or seed fertilizer and even watering the mounds and holes, and then spray and pack the seeds upwards, spreading about 25 g per square meter. In the next few days, if there is no rain, give the land a second layer of soft water to help it grow.

Continue to kill late-grown adults to encourage them to extend their exposure for as long as possible. With the onset of spring storms and hurricanes, be extra careful to prevent any tall species from suffering or being harmed.

Dates for your notebook

Tomorrow, September 12, Open and Vegetable Sale Day at Freela Gardens, Abelex, Co Laois (R32W5W7), Garden Designer Arthur Shackleton House, Admission € 5, Under 12 years free, see arthurshackleton.com For details. September 18-26, Venus Mountain Children’s Garden Garden, Tibredden, Mutan Lane, Dublin 16, Spring Sale 20% of all plants and more discounts on some plants, see mountvenusnursery.com. Sunday, September 19 and Saturday 25th at Dumor Country School, Old, Co Laois, two-day course by gardener gardener and environmentalist Tangu de Tolgoit, € 100, see, see € 100, see dunmorecountryschool.ie.

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