In Afghanistan, greenhouse families help grow food all year round

A few years ago, Wahida, a 45-year-old farmer and mother of six, could not afford to buy coal to heat her house. Today, she is the sole breadwinner of her family and earns enough to send her six children to school.

Her life changed in 2015 when she was selected to receive from the National Garden and Livestock Development Project (NLP) Micro Greenhouse. Wahida, who lives in the village of Gafarkhel in the district of Hessa Awel Kohistan, began growing vegetables known as pumpkins and tomatoes during the summer, as well as spring and winter salads. Neighbors bought her plenty of vegetables, and she earned $ 10,000 to $ 15,000 a month in Afghanistan.

The NHLP continues to support Wahida to improve its horticultural skills and increase its income. “We have monthly lessons on growing vegetables in the greenhouse, and we learn how to apply fertilizer,” says Wahida, who regularly attends. She says they have been taught to make their own fertilizer from organic waste. The program has been very helpful to us.

Saima Sahar Saeed, a 28-year-old NHLP social affairs officer, said many families in Hesa ​​Awel Kohistan have benefited from the Greenhouse initiative launched by the NHLP in 2013.

“Most of the women in this area do not work outside the home, so we thought it would be good to give them something to do and at the same time provide for their families. This greenhouse has helped us a lot. If we can’t grow anything in the winter, but now we can at least grow enough to feed my family.

Read the full article at www.worldbank.org.

Leave a Comment