Lightly colored leaves can brighten the dark corner

The leaf is an essential part of any flower garden. Plants with beautiful foliage bloom in the summer when a variety of plants bloom. Rich, green, the foliage is the backbone of your garden. It is important to choose bold shapes, fine textures, and foliage that will make your garden more attractive. This is especially true if you have some different leaf colors and one lasts until the summer.

Adding some silver, white, bright colors, or various tree leaves may be all that is needed to make your flowers stand out. A slightly lighter leaf helps to brighten up a flower garden or dark corner and brighten them if you place them in a flower bed. One reason is that this light-colored leaf does not conflict with other colors in the garden, so they can reflect anywhere and secondly, they will reflect the light and illuminate your garden at night.

To lighten this dark space, this road is lined with blue-gray hues and flexible hues.

Shade gardens tend to have a lot of foliage and this is because we plant a lot every year and every year they need at least 6 hours of sun. If you have shaded areas of different colors, textures, and leaves, you can lighten these areas and make them look beautiful.

Silver plants, such as Artemisia or sheep’s ears, can only be used to increase interest and to illuminate a little more space. Artemisia, also known as Wormwood and Pavis Palace, is a soft-leaf-gray plant. It gives a wonderful contrast to the green leaves, which may be all you need to get rid of boredom, and they can sometimes help you avoid too much energy and never too much rest.

The sheep's ears on the front of the photo and the Armenian visitors in the background will be admired in this white garden.

Do you have any areas or points of interest that you would like to show in the garden? If so, consider using simple colored leaves to divert attention. Take, for example, the Stone Road along the Hosta and Fern Garden, which ends with a popular monument. You’ll see that road like Jack Frost Brunner covered in lush greenery and how it attracts your attention to that beloved statue. Differences in color and texture are subtle ways to draw your attention.

Bruneira

Have you ever thought about a white garden? Light leaves and white flowers are arranged on a dark tree background. These gardens are peaceful and loving. White flowers come alive at night. This will be the only vegetable for a one-night wedding. White and silver leaves form the basis of a white garden.

Gray and green leaves shine one way or another.

The brightly colored leaves are also beautifully planted. Artemisia, with its silver-gray leaves, complements flowers and is prominent. Silver King Artemisia, which grows to a height of three feet, is rapidly expanding.

Lighting the garden at night does a good job and gives a pleasant texture. There is also a more compact form called the “Queen of Silver.”

Calcium, “Queen or Heart” Brunera is definitely two more great plants to add to a night garden.

Calcium is colorful.

Choose leaves of different heights and different shapes and have some plant frequency when changing your garden. It is easy to fill your garden with white plants, but you need some variation.

There are so many different types of plants to choose from and the list goes on and on. Start by selecting some popular classic white or a variety of tree leaves.

It adds soft and nice contrast to the lamb's ear.

Some of the most popular plants I plant for their leaves are: Calcium, Brunera, “Queen of Hearts” and Jack Frost, Artemisia, Sheep Ear, Variegated White and Green Leaves, or Blue-Painted Japanese Fern. , Russian sage, Dusty Miller and Solomon ‘Varietham.

These herbaceous plants are a great addition to any garden and can be given to the garden if they are done in moderation and planted between flowers or other foliage. They certainly illuminate the environment.

The contrast is amazing.

Betty Montgomery

Betty Montgomery is a prolific gardener and author of Hydranas: How to Grow, Grow and Enjoy. She can be reached at bmontgomery40@gmail.com.

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