Representatives seek NewDA and Thompson support in fight against small cherry disease

Washington DC -Today, Representative Dan News (WA-04) and the House Agriculture Committee have written a letter to USAID Administrator Kevin Shia regarding the spread of smallpox disease (LCD) and its effects on Republican leader Glen “GT” Thompson (PA-15). On sweet cherry producers all over the United States. He recently met with fruit tree growers in Central Washington, Republic of New York, and leader Thompson discussed ongoing industry challenges, including small cherry disease.

Today we are writing to you about the occurrence of smallpox (LCD) disease affecting sweet cherry producers in the United States. We appreciate the attention of Deputy Administrator Osama El-Lycee in this month’s meeting with representatives of the Cherry Industry. They wrote lawmakers.

They continued“Over the past three years, the virus has re-emerged in the state of Washington. It is also being distributed in Oregon, with cases reported in California and Utah. LCD damages the tree, resulting in tiny and useless fruit. The only solution now is to remove the tree. Before the LCD has already spread, the symptoms usually do not appear, and eventually the entire garden needs to be removed.

They concludedAs the fight against LCD continues, we respectfully request that the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service work with the Cherry Industry and allocate additional research and testing capacity to destroy the LCD.

Below are excerpts from support organizations.

“Small Cherry Disease (LCD) is having a devastating effect on the Northwest Cherry Industry and continues to spread at an astonishing rate. We commend the leadership of the House of Representatives and ranking member Thompson for raising funds for research and experimental needs at APHIS. Without immediate action, LCD will continue to attack more and more gardens. ” Mark Powers, president of the Northwest Horticulture Council.

With the rapid spread of smallpox (LCD), cherry growers in the Pacific Northwest are in serious danger. Immediate action is needed to ensure that the disease is effective. We are delighted to encourage Thompson, a member of the House of Representatives and a member of the Board of Trustees, to provide funding for LCD research and testing. Sen. Gilbert, president of the Gilbert Orchids.

Read the full letter over here And below.

Today we are writing to you about the occurrence of smallpox (LCD) disease affecting sweet cherry producers in the United States. We appreciate the attention of Deputy Administrator Osama El-Lice, who met with representatives of the Cherry Industry last month.

The disease first appeared in British Columbia, Canada, in the 1930’s, and soon spread to Washington and California in the 1940s and 1970s. When the virus first appeared, it completely destroyed the region’s cherry industry.

Over the past three years, the virus has re-emerged and reached the epidemic in Washington State. It is also being distributed in Oregon, with cases reported in California and Utah. LCD damages the tree, resulting in tiny and useless fruit. The only solution now is to remove the tree. LCDs do not usually show up before they have already spread, and eventually they need to be removed from the entire garden. Planting costs are currently estimated at $ 64,000 per hectare, and lost revenue is estimated at $ 54,000 over the seven years it takes for the new trees to be fully harvested. I

The Cherry Industry has invested nearly $ 2 million in research on LCD. Additional resources are needed for research through federal programs such as the National Vegetation Network and the Plant Pest and Disease Management and Disaster Management Program, as well as to reduce LCD proliferation in neighboring trees. And gardens.

Congress continues to have a strong desire to fight the LCC. According to HR 133, the 2021 Fiscal Year Omnibus and Covid Aid and Response Act states:

The agreement concerns concerns about the spread of small cherries in the Pacific Northwest and California and the potential threat to the region’s stone fruit. The agreement encourages the author to prioritize work and research to identify and mitigate disease and to develop effective control mechanisms with farmers, universities and other partners.

Once again, we appreciate the commitment of Deputy Administrator El-Lisse to LCD and the sweet cherry industry. We also appreciate continued support from the Animal and Plant Health Service and our partnership with Oregon State and Oregon State University to control LCD in PH. As the fight against LCD continues, we respectfully request that the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service work with the Cherry Industry and allocate additional research and testing capacity to eliminate LCD.

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