The Forgotten Artist Finds The Sun In The Sun With Garfield Park’s’ Still Alive Life ”

At the Garfield Park Conservatory, October 17, 2021, “Still Life in Real Life” (Patty Wetley / WTTW News)

Still, as a special artist on life and landscapes, Charles Ethan Porter, a late 19th-century artist, translated scenes from nature to canvas.

Now the Garfield Park Convent has changed the process by using spawns and plants instead of brushes to transform the garden into a lively interpretation of Porter’s work.

The exhibition, “Still in Real Life,” will run until October 17 and represent a future for construction. At last year’s exhibition “Monte Flowers” in the garden of Western art canon (see some of the world’s most famous paintings (see “Water Flowers”)), Porter is introducing visitors to a single image. He was recently rescued from a stranger.

“I want people to know,” said Peter Vorotos, deputy director of fruits and vegetables at the Chicago Park District. He is very clever enough not to be known.

Charles Ethan Porter was an artist in the late 19th century, still unique in life and landscape.  (Garfield Park Conservatory / Facebook)Charles Ethan Porter was an artist in the late 19th century, still unique in life and landscape. (Garfield Park Conservatory / Facebook)

Porter was born in the mid-1800s to liberate African-American parents in Connecticut and became the first African-American to attend the New York National Design Academy. Nature still loves the life of flowers and fruits – especially apples – and later, landscapes. At the time, he was the only black artist skilled in these genres, according to scholars.

Its distinguishing features are: beautiful eyes for color, unobtrusive arrangements and unusual subjects, including insects and crabs.

“The work is beautiful,” Vorotos said. It feels somewhat more modern, more relevant than some Dutch masters.

Although Porter won early acclaim and success, his work was bought by a lesser fan than Mark Twain, who sold fewer and fewer paintings over the years as the tastes changed. Like many of his predecessors, Porter died in 1923 in relative darkness.

Demand for his work began to renew in the 1980’s. In 2008, Porter was the subject of the first museum exhibition. His paintings are now housed in a collection of institutions, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, but most remain in the hands of strangers or those who do not know their importance.

Perhaps the exhibition will encourage one to take a closer look at the collection of dust in the attic or on the ground floor and perhaps find the long-lost porter. At the very least, Vorotos said he hopes people will read on Porter.

“I want people to know about it,” said Vorotos.

The artist's garden main walkway.  (Patty Wetley / WTTW News)The artist’s garden main walkway. (Patty Wetley / WTTW News)

Like a movie or a TV show “inspired by real events,” the conservation exhibition does not try to create more scenes than Porter’s paintings, but rather defines its beauty.

In some cases, the plants found in some of the Porter’s pictures are grouped together, such as rye, corn, and sunflower seeds.

One of the highlights of the exhibition is the semi-circular section of the garden, which aims to mimic Porter’s creative process. To the finished picture.

See more exhibition highlights:

Porter's pictures, including "Spring landscape," They are present throughout the Conservative Exhibition.  (Patty Wetley / WTTW News) Pictures of Porter’s paintings, including “Spring Landscape”, are on display at the curtain exhibition. (Patty Wetley / WTTW News)

Images of “poster” images, including “Spring Landscape”, are on display at the Conservative Exhibition.


The living wall of the exhibition for Porter, "Spring landscape," With grass and flowers in a variety of textures and colors in the picture landscape.  (Patty Wetley / WTTW News)The living wall of the exhibition honors Porter’s “harvest landscape” with grasses and flowers in a variety of textures and colors. (Patty Wetley / WTTW News)

The stunning living wall of the exhibition celebrates the “Spring Landscape” with grass and flowers inspired by the various textures and colors of the painting.


Porter loves to paint strawberries.  The exhibit looks like strawberries and includes not only the right fruit but also the flower gourd (aka, globa amaranth).  (Patty Wetley / WTTW News)Porter loves to paint strawberries. The exhibit looks like strawberries and includes not only the right fruit but also the flower gourd (aka, globa amaranth). (Patty Wetley / WTTW News)

Porter loves to paint strawberries. The exhibition includes not only the real fruit but also the flower gourd (aka, Global amaranth), because it looks like a strawberry.


One of the highlights of the exhibition is grouping "Frame" In the circles of the Red Collect.  (Patty Wetley / WTTW News)One of the highlights of the exhibition is the “carved” red circus circles. (Patty Wetley / WTTW News)

One of the highlights of the exhibition is a painting of a favorite of the Red Colius circles. Vorotes admits that it is dangerous to put shade-loving colitis in full sun, but the plants are in good condition. Although the teams were mostly designed to be the same, the rabbits were injured in the guard’s installation and threw in some of the best plans.


Corn is not widely seen in ornamental gardens, but Porter does include one of his most famous paintings.  (Patty Wetley / WTTW News)Corn is not widely seen in ornamental gardens, but Porter does include one of his most famous paintings. (Patty Wetley / WTTW News)

Maize is not widely used in ornamental gardens, but Vorotes Porter says it was chosen for the exhibition because it included one of his most famous paintings, “Still Life Maize.”


Carnations fell out of favor, but Porter loved to paint them.  In a state of ecstasy, the guards planted a planar vortex in the sun.  (Patty Wetley / WTTW News) Carnations fell out of favor, but Porter loved to paint them. In a state of ecstasy, the guards planted a planar vortex in the sun. (Patty Wetley / WTTW News)

Late fall from flower growers, but Porter is often one of the flowers in the picture. Joyfully in the “danger” of gardening, the parks of the courtyard twisted to reach the sun.


There are 8,000 to 10,000 individual plants in the artist’s Paradise Exhibition, including the eye-catching amaranth. Many plants have been planted from seed, beginning in February.


Contact Patty Wetli @pattywetli | (773) 509-5623 | [email protected]

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