UK’s Fruit Squad Army: How 16,000 Workers Flew From 37 Countries for 2021

Fruit picks have more than doubled this year due to a shortage of British and Eastern European workers combined with the Brexit and Covenant epidemics.

According to the Home Office, more than 16,000 workers, including in Barsedos, Nepal, Tajikistan, Kenya, and the Philippines, have been sent to 37 countries by hiring gardeners by 2021.

By comparison, by 2020, only 7,000 workers from 14 countries had received work visas.

Due to the ongoing struggle to hire enough fruit and horticulturalists, farmers say, some farmers will have to go back and increase their production, as it will reduce the decay in the field.

One British farmer told locals: “They don’t want to work in the field,” while another hired 37 Britons last year, leaving only seven weeks later, reports The Times.

Far from the Philippines, they have branded workers “murderers” – especially those who have to cover air prices.

According to domestic statistics, more than 16,000 workers, including in Barsedos, Nepal, Tajikistan, Kenya, and the Philippines, have been sent to 37 countries by 2021 after being hired by gardeners.  Herefordshire (Herefordshire, August 2018)

According to domestic statistics, more than 16,000 workers, including in Barsedos, Nepal, Tajikistan, Kenya, and the Philippines, have been sent to 37 countries by 2021 after being hired by gardeners. Herefordshire (Herefordshire, August 2018)

It was only after the UK introduced the 2019 Workers’ Visa Program that voters could fly from any country around the world.

The program has been approved for 30,000 workers this year, and prior to Brexit, most came from Eastern Europe.

However, many Bulgarians and Romanians returned home in the wake of the Brexit double and the Kovi epidemic.

At the same time, many Europeans, who are more stable or more stable, now choose low-paying and better-paying jobs.

That means farmers have to go far to find workers.

According to the report, Ukraine has the highest yields of fruits and vegetables this year, followed by Russia, Belarus and Moldova.

The five were in collaboration with Bulgaria, Nepal.

Barbados offers more than 100 collectors, and the Caribbean Ministry of Labor expects the work to be popular with people who “do not want to work in cold weather, or for long periods of time, for six months or more.”

The minimum wage in Barbados is around 3 3 per hour – up to 20 20 per hour, according to the Times.

Workers from Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan – and some as far away as Kenya, Nigeria, and the Philippines — cover most travel expenses.

David Simons, Managing Director of Riviera West West Cornell, which produces baskets, cabbage and broccoli for supermarkets, said most of the 300 employees currently employed are from Russia, Kazakhstan and Tajikistan.

He told The Times: “Over the past five years, we have relied heavily on Bulgarians and Romanians, but this time we have lost about half our staff.

They have decided to return home or to Germany or to other countries, or they have become easier delivery drivers than working in the field.

We have increased wages by 12 percent to keep them afloat and most of them earning 15 to 20 pounds an hour.

Stephen Taylor, managing director of Winthrowwood Farm Limited in Kent, warns that the labor market has been

Stephen Taylor, managing director of Winthrowwood Farm Limited in Kent, warns that the labor market has been “narrow and narrow” for the past two years.

Locals do not want to start earlier. They do not want to work in the field.

If the “current workers” pilot does not continue, the fruit and vegetable industry is over in the UK. It’s so hard. ‘

Asked about the air miles to fly in the crew, he said, ‘That’s what we have to do, you know, it’s life-threatening.

However, if people do not come to our country and harvest their crops, they will probably grow abroad and enter the UK, so you should look at the green evidence of that.

He believes that hundreds of thousands of pounds of produce have been wasted on farms in Cornell due to labor shortages.

In March last year, local secretary George Eustis launched a Peak for Britain campaign, urging farms to “mobilize British workers” to fill the gap left by EU workers.

However, the drive was unsuccessful by the farmers, and Mr. Simons received about 250 job applications from Britain.

And out of 37 of those who accepted the job, only seven weeks remained. This year, only one British applicant accepted the offer.

Some ministers hope that by the end of this month, there will be more Britons willing to take over if the crisis is over.

But Tom Bradshaw, of the National Farmers’ Union, said:

In March last year, Environmental Secretary George Euss launched an election campaign for Britain, urging farms to

In March last year, Environmental Secretary George Euss launched an election campaign for Britain, urging farms to “mobilize British workers” to fill the gap left by EU workers.

Stephen Taylor, managing director of Winwood Farms Limited in Kent, has warned that the labor market has been “narrow and narrow” over the past two years.

Mr Taylor said: “95% of the country’s produce and packaged fruits and products are made in Eastern Europe.

People who have not been eligible since the end of June, at least, will not be able to work.

We are not talking about a few tens of thousands, we are not talking about hundreds of thousands of people working in the UK. That is a huge pit.

Two years ago, Mr. Taylor’s company received about 20 applications a day from people who wanted to come to the UK to pick up the brakes, but this year it dropped to just two.

While the government is cracking down on four recruitment companies, payments are being made by farmers.

The Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs said: “We will continue to work closely with the industry to understand the needs and supply of manpower, including fixed and current labor standards, and encourage employers to make long-term investments in UK domestic and automation. Technology. ‘

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