What is that mysterious disease of magnolia trees?

I returned to the office this week after a week-long vacation with many questions from homeowners to identify a mysterious disease affecting magnifying trees in their landscape.

A little research led to the conclusion that the trunk and branches were colorful, clustered, distorted growth, and the black, dusty substance on the leaves came to a conclusion – a magnifying glass with mold.

Magnolia (Neolecanium cornuparvum) is one of the largest and most visible insects in the Ohio landscape. Have you ever heard of scales? Although not like most insects that we think will affect trees on the surface, scales are insect-like.

A local resident recently submitted this photo to Ohio State University Extension for inspection.  Magnolia is characterized by colorful mounds on a branch of a magnolia tree.

Often on tree branches and trunks a soft and shiny brownish-brown or slightly soft-orange color and a smooth outer layer appear on the branches of the tree. In the pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up pop-up.

This type of damage weakens branches and growing branches, impeding growth. Leaf development can also stop the formation of a thin layer. Growing scales are usually covered with white mela wax and can be seen in white color and appearance. A constant diet and severe epidemics can kill a mature tree.

A second problem with insect scales is the secretion of excess vegetable juice as pure adhesive. When the scales are eaten, the tip of the honey drips and coats on nearby leaves and branches, creating an ideal environment for the growth of a black fungus called mildew.

A large bird hides under leaves and branches under the damaged parts of the tree, providing an ideal environment for the formation of a black fungus called black mold.  Honey is a sticky, sweet substance that is produced by insects.  It is very attractive to ants, wasps, bees and flies that love to eat on it.

In most cases, soy mildew is considered harmless and even more harmful, but when photosynthesis is a barrier, it can cause problems when it completely covers the surface of the leaf. An infected magnifier can plow anything under it with honeycombs, especially benches, bird baths, garden paintings, and sidewalks. The honeycomb can also attract ants, bees, wasps and flies.

The main target of this pest is various species of magnolia. Sugar, star and lily magnolia species are the most vulnerable and most susceptible to serious outbreaks. Other species, such as the pumpkin tree and southern magnolia, are less likely to be affected by magnolia.

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